Senator Rand Paul announced that there would be a Special Counsel for Dr. Fauci when Republicans take the Senate in November. “As chairman of a committee with subpoena power, I would appoint someone who has the “bandwidth”—someone who has been an attorney general, or an assistant attorney general” to investigate Fauci.”

Paul makes a number of assumptions, not all of them wrong. For example, I think he will be in the Senate majority and will head a committee capable of appointing someone. But the minute he starts describing that person as “someone who has been an attorney general” or similar language, it tells me Rand Paul still doesn’t yet grasp what we’re dealing with.

An accounting of the Nanny State fear-mongering bureaucrats who have killed thousands and injured millions with their policies is needed, but that is only the tip of the iceberg of what is required. Lemme ‘splain:

America is as divided as any time since 1865, and the similarities are substantial. In 1865, there remained a largely (almost universally) unpunished group (former Confederates, Democrats, and more generally southerners) who were unrepentant. To Abraham Lincoln’s discredit, he believed until his assassination that these were just “Americans” who could be brought back into the American family “with charity for all.” He ordered no trials, save that of Confederate States of America president Jefferson Davis and for the officer in charge of Andersonville prison. Confederate officers and legislators, even those who refused to sign an oath of allegiance to the United States (having previously broken their oaths to the same nation) were not punished in any way. Plantation owners lost their slaves, but not their property or prestige. Unrepentant Bourbons were elected back into power within a year. Across the South, there was a general attitude that while slavery did not exist any longer, slaves still did in one form or another. It took almost 100 years to finally rid the South of many of those attitudes. I believe that failing to bring the guilty to account on the part of the victorious Union, while well-intentioned, extended racism and civil rights issues for at least 50 years longer than would have otherwise occurred. In some ways, the Civil War did not end until 1898 when U.S. soldiers, riding in trains through the former Confederacy to fight in the Spanish-American War, were cheered by the local populations.

Today’s divisions are actually in some ways more difficult. No, there is not the deep-seated race hatred at work, but the other fissures are more numerous and equally dangerous. First, there is the issue of the vax mandates caused by and ordered by Dr. Fauci at one level or another.

How Fauci got in the position of power he did remains an unresolved debate: I think (but have little direct “pwoof” to quote former Clinton advisor Lanny Davis) that Mike Pence, via his Chief of Staff, brought to President Donald Trump a plan for a states-oriented “federalist” approach to the China Virus; that Trump, in his natural federalist leanings, embraced that; and that unbeknownst to Trump (but probably not to Pence), this would result in states having to turn back to the federal government and Dr. Fauci in particular for advice and protocols.

Obviously, the result of this was the national lockdown, the practice of masking/social distancing, and the worship of the vax. No one should be surprised that Trump backed a vaccine approach. He is a businessman. Businessmen see things as problems to be solved, not long-term issues to be accommodated or lived with. Moreover, “Operation Warp Speed” gave him the chance to, JFK-moon-landing-like, sponsor a national quick solution. And to his credit, Trump did try to bring in alternative voices, such as John Ioannidis and Scott Atlas, but they were far too few and were outside Dr. Fauci’s medical research octopus described by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. in The Real Anthony Fauci (If you’d told me five years ago I’d ally with a Kennedy whose name wasn’t John, I’d have sent you for therapy).

How and why Fauci gained the power he did over the China Virus “pandemic” is a story yet to be written. Did Jared Kushner play a part? Likely. But the biggest and most criminal part, other than that of Dr. Fauci and his CDC/NIH minions themselves, were played by the governors, who folded under pressure from big city mayors to go along with lockdowns, masks, and vaxxes. Consider my own city of Phoenix. At first, Governor Doug Ducey, a soft country club Republican, was not inclined to lock everything down. But then businesses in Phoenix and Tucson—the two largest population centers in the state—which were locked down due to the orders of Democrat mayors, started to complain that the suburban/outlying areas which were not locked down were stealing all their business. Better to have all fail than just some in the cities. So Ducey (with the full support of almost all mayors) extended the lockdown statewide.

There were exceptions: South Dakota never locked down; Governor Brian Kemp in Georgia freed his slaves early (only to receive a verbal rap from Trump saying it was “premature”); and Governor Ron DeSantis followed Governor Kristi Noem of South Dakota and Kemp in finally opening his state.

Now, as many of us predicted early on, the final data from some of the studies is arriving and it does not support the vaxiopaths or even the maskiopaths in the slightest. The vaxxes did cause deadly side effects, particularly related to the heart, particularly for the young. We have also seen studies, not overwhelming in number yet, but substantial, that the lockdowns themselves caused significant damage in multitudinous ways. Ditto the maskies. All of this was inflicted on people on purpose. No one, and I repeat, no one had ever subjected the China Virus vaxxes to any long-term study because they were rushed into use. That in itself was malpractice and criminal.

Yet where are we? Today around half the population still believes in vaxxes and maskies, although it’s not clear at all if they really believe in the efficacy of these nostrums or if they have such massive cognitive dissonance, as vax expert Steve Kirsch argued, that they cannot cope with the reality that their cherished cure not only does not cure but harms. I think Steve is right, but does not go far enough. The cognitive dissonance involves the dawning realization that moms and dads may have killed their own kids; may have sacrificed granny, or may have damaged irreparably their own health. Coming to grips with those realities will take a very long time.

Think of World War II veterans of combat, especially in the Pacific jungles. Many of them only in their very twilight years opened up about what they did, and the actions they took. Accepting that you were responsible for gutting another man or unleashing your flamethrower into a pillbox, no matter how righteous the cause, is psychologically numbing. We are now seeing a similar resistance to the realities of the vax due, I think, to this same awareness that many people contributed to a new American “holocaust” of sorts.

The same holds true for the election fraudsters, who deep down know that not only was 2020 stolen, but that Donald Trump was robbed of a great deal of productivity for America by the criminal “Muh Russia” probes. Americans, not just Trump, paid a huge price for not putting Hillary Clinton and James Comey in jail when they had the opportunity.

These fissures are deep, and so-called liberals, the woke fascists of our age, have no interest in bridging them. Well-meaning Karens, who really thought giving grandpa the poison would help him, will take years to come to grips with their stupidity or sin. Either way, what is required to begin a true healing process are serious investigations with serious penalties and serious Nuremberg-style results—on both the medical and political fronts. We’ll get to the climate hoaxers another day. Nothing less will suffice.

Larry Schweikart is the author of Dragonslayers: Six Presidents and their War with the Swamp, the co-author of A Patriot’s History of the United States with Michael Allenand the founder of the Wild World of History curriculum website (www.wildworldofhistory.com).